James Barrese on how PayPal learned to listen to its developers

James Barrese on how PayPal learned to listen to its developers

API Economist: What challenges was PayPal facing with its developers?

James Barrese: I'll be frank. As an organization, we had not been listening like we should have. We were growing so quickly and dealing with some parts of the business that we didn't pay as much attention as we should have. That's changed. So, in the last year, David Marcus has been named as president. He came through our acquisition of Zong. He's a great technologist and a great entrepreneur. I was named as CTO in the last year as well. What we're doing is we're driving a renaissance at PayPal and essentially going back to our innovative roots. And right away we saw we really needed to listen to our developers.

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Roy Veevers-Carter on how APIs simplify the complexities of the airline industry

Roy Veevers-Carter on how APIs simplify the complexities of the airline industry

API Economist: FlightLookup has been delivering travel data to mobile devices long before the arrival of smartphones. When did you get started?

Rory Veevers-Carter: We have been serving the needs of the airline data industry since 1996. We started out taking airline data and built a dynamic routing engine and turned it into Windows flight schedule lookup products. We've expanded that core based technology to deliver it to mobile phones, originally to the Palm VII. Our flight schedule and our flight status applications originally launched when the Palm 7 came out. We've been in the value added data delivery space for travel information for a very long time.

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David Walsh on how to be a good API and Mobile App Developer

David Walsh on how to be a good API and Mobile App Developer

API Economist: How long have you been developing code, and what was it that got you interested?

David WalshThat's a good question. I was sitting in my keyboarding class freshman year of high school, and my friend nudged me. He said, "Hey, check out this website.” It was a GeoCities website about Pulp Fiction. I said, "Oh, man. Whose is that?" He replied, "It's mine." I was totally blown away that you didn't need to be this big genius developer to create even a basic web page. That summer I totally nerded out and learned everything I could. I think I was 14 years old then, and I've been in love with web development ever since. I spent a ton of time back then using view source to see how people did things, and 15 years later I'm doing the same thing every day. So that is basically how I got into web development.

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Julius Marchwicki on Ford using APIs for better customer experience

Julius Marchwicki on Ford using APIs for better customer experience

API Economist: Congratulations on being the first automobile manufacturer to launch a mobile app developer program, announced at CES back in January.

Julius Marchwicki: Thank you very much!

API Economist: What was your API strategy behind the launch?

Julius Marchwicki: The strategy behind SYNC at large and what Ford has done is really to focus on what our consumers are doing. We went out and talked to a large number of consumers. We started to understand what they were doing inside of their vehicles, and what gaps we needed to fulfill for them. That's how embedded navigation came to be many years ago.

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John Musser on how to start an API developer community

John Musser on how to start an API developer community

API Economist:  You founded ProgrammableWeb back in 2005, is that correct?

John Musser: That’s correct. It’s coming up on its eighth anniversary this summer. It was really the birth of the open API and web mash movement. The phrase “web mashup” was really coined four or five months before we started ProgrammableWeb. That was the same spring when Housingmaps.com was built, which was essentially the first quintessential mashup (a mashup of Craigslist and Google Maps).

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