Mark Boyd on banking APIs changing one of the stodgiest sectors

Mark Boyd on banking APIs changing one of the stodgiest sectors

2016 is the year of banking APIs. Tech journalist Mark Boyd dives into how fintech startups, open banking standards and the banking API are changing the way traditional banking works, as they use new techniques like microservices and API strategy to break away from a legacy architecture to move towards a more agile, customer-centric approach.

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Darrel Miller on whether Hypermedia APIs will save the universe

Darrel Miller on whether Hypermedia APIs will save the universe

The Hypermedia API is certainly a controversial topic, regaining traction as it is claimed to be a solution to the Internet of Things. This more accepted nickname for HATEOAS [Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State], has been around for awhile now, mainly in the HTTP space, but is making headlines again with new potential use cases. To jumpstart The API Economist again, we thought we’d start closer to home with one of our own Azure API Management team members Darrel Miller, co-host of YouTube channel “In the Mood for HTTP” and owner of the Bizcoder blog. Darrel is a veteran software developer with more than 20 years of experience in all things HTTP, Hypermedia, HttpClient and the Web API.

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The API Economist Relaunch in the new Age of the API

The API Economist Relaunch in the new Age of the API

Welcome to The API Economist re-release, a resource dedicated to spreading the experience and advice of API pioneers for the technology and strategy of the API economy. We’re back from hiatus after our founder Apiphany was acquired by cloud platform and infrastructure leader Microsoft Azure in October 2013, and we relaunch under the patronage of Azure API Management. We’re kicking off with a slightly new look, a slightly new format, and even more up-and-coming and established API influencers.

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Mark Radcliffe on intellectual property, software patents, & open source software is Eating the World

Mark Radcliffe on intellectual property, software patents, & open source software is Eating the World

API Economist: Is the reason why intellectual property and software are so challenging due to the sheer lack of case law that's been established?

Mark Radcliffe: I think that's part of it. But I also think you need to go back a little bit and talk about how software came to be covered by copyright. If you go back to the 1980s, there were very respectable intellectual property lawyers who would tell you that software was not copyrightable because it was a functional “work”.  Only certain types of software would be copyrightable. Moreover, when the Copyright Act of 1976 was enacted, Congress deferred the decision about protecting software under copyright until they received a report from a special committee, the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU). Although CONTU recommended protection for software under copyright, one commissioner suggested that copyright not apply to “computer program in the form in which it is capable of being used to control computer operations.”  Now the courts have made it very clear that software is protected by copyright, in fact almost any form of software is copyrightable. But copyright is actually a pretty poor fit for software. It's a poor fit because there's a large degree of functionality in software. Copyright was designed for music and literature and novels, things where you'd have immense scope in the choice of how you create the “work”.

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